The garment factory’s garment washing process can kill workers, report says

A new report from the International Labour Organisation (ILO) has found that garment factories in Bangladesh are routinely killing workers and destroying their health.

The study also found that the garment factories’ processes can damage workers’ lungs and cause infections.

The study was conducted by ILO researcher Marnie Schumacher, who has also studied garment factories before.

Schumachers report found that most factories do not comply with international standards and that some factories are so poorly designed that workers can suffer from breathing problems, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and other health problems.

“The worst of these factories are the ones where the production of garments is done at temperatures above 40 degrees Celsius (100 degrees Fahrenheit), which is considered the critical temperature for causing acute and chronic health conditions such as COPD,” the ILO wrote.

These conditions, along with the lack of access to basic health services, lead to high rates of occupational and occupational related illnesses,” the report said.”

These factories also have the highest incidence of injuries, particularly among workers in the garment industry.”

These conditions, along with the lack of access to basic health services, lead to high rates of occupational and occupational related illnesses,” the report said.

In addition, the ILG found that some of the factories’ factories were poorly designed, with a variety of flaws and problems.

In some cases, the factories are not equipped with adequate ventilation systems and there are no workers’ safety measures.

ILO said that factories are required to have a working air-conditioning system and ventilation equipment, but that these requirements do not always exist and are often not implemented.

Some of the factory factories also failed to comply with the law.

The ILO says it is aware of a number of factories that are failing to comply, including some that were recently banned for their failure to provide safe working conditions.

According to the ILF report, there are at least 1,811 garment factories worldwide.

It is also unclear whether the companies that manufacture garments in Bangladesh will be subject to the rules.

According the ILN, it is also concerned that the country has been identified as a key source of counterfeit goods and that companies have been caught illegally using the country’s low-cost manufacturing to ship clothing overseas.